Brooklyn Bridge: June 8, 2013

The Brooklyn Bridge connects Downtown Brooklyn to lower Manhattan.  The Brooklyn Bridge is a suspension bridge designed by John A. Roebling.

On this day, I crossed Brooklyn Bridge with a Boy Scout Troop.  They are not pictured for privacy reasons.

We took the subway to Jay Street in Brooklyn and walked across the bridge into lower Manhattan.

Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges are close to each other in Brooklyn.

Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges are close to each other in Brooklyn.

Approaching the bridge from Brooklyn

Approaching the bridge from Brooklyn

New York Harbor and Promenade as seen from bridge

New York Harbor and Promenade as seen from bridge

Brooklyn Bridge showing pedestrian and bicycle paths

Brooklyn Bridge showing pedestrian and bicycle paths

In front of reconstruction plaque on east tower

In front of reconstruction plaque on east tower

Under the arch

Under the arch

Brooklyn Bridge arch with One World Trade Center Tower in the distance.

Brooklyn Bridge arch with One World Trade Center Tower in the distance

Here we took a walking tour of lower Manhattan, viewing the major sights.

New York City Municipal building

New York City Municipal building

Welcome to Manhattan sign as you approach Manhattan from the bridge

In Brooklyn there is MetroTech and several technical colleges.

On the Manhattan side are City Hall and related city government buildings, including the Municipal Building and The  Board of Health and the financial district.  Across from the courts and the Municipal Building is Foley Square and a statue “Triumph of the Human Spirit” which is a rendition of West African Chi Wara headdresses, overlooking the African Burial Ground.

Foley Square

Foley Square

Chi Wara

Chi Wara

The African Burial Ground which was uncovered during excavation for the Federal Building.  Considerable time was spent in the African Burial Ground where we watched a film of the history of the burial grounds and viewed the exhibits.  These are some of the many Adinkra Symbols etched in the memorial.

Asase Ye Duru

Asase Ye Duru

Funtunfunefu Denkyefunefu

Funtunfunefu Denkyefunefu

Etched in one of the panels is the outline of the African Burial Ground under the streets of Manhattan.

Outline of African Burial Ground

Outline of African Burial Ground

In this area are also the Charging BullFederal Hall, New York Stock Exchange,  

Lego model of the Stock Exchange

Trading floor of NYSE

Trading floor of NYSE

On the trading floor

On the trading floor

 Federal Reserve Bank,

Federal Reserve Bank

Federal Reserve Bank

and the Federal Building.

On Water Street, near the Stock Exchange is The New York City Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

IMG_0415 IMG_0416

We also spent time at the World Trade Center Memorial.  We were able to get tickets at the entrance and had about a 20 minute wait to get through security.

World Trade Center Memorial Pool

World Trade Center Memorial Pool

One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center

At the tip of Manhattan in Battery Park you can catch the Staten Island Ferry as well as ferries to Governor’s Island, Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.  Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty are currently closed due to damage sustained during Super Storm Sandy in October, 2012.  Just north of Battery Park is the   Alexander Hamilton U.S. Customs House which houses the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian.

https://i0.wp.com/nmai.si.edu/sites/1/dynamic/medias/sb_sys_medias_media_key_832.jpgWikipedia photo

From here we caught the subway back home.

Brooklyn Bridge:

Type of bridge:  Suspension / Cable-Stayed

Length: 5,989 ft   1825 m

Width: 85 ft

Height:  276.5 ft above mean high water

Longest span:  1595 ft  486 m

Crosses:   East River

Connects:  Lower Manhattan to Downtown Brooklyn

Construction of The Brooklyn Bridge started in 1870 and was opened in 1883.

Carries: Cars, pedestrians and bicycles

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One thought on “Brooklyn Bridge: June 8, 2013

  1. Pingback: Brooklyn Bridge: November 28, 2015 | Bridge Walks NYC

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